NDT-EDUCATIONAL

New Target For Treating Prediabetes In Patients With Kidney Disease

Insulin resistance, or prediabetes, in individuals with kidney disease may be caused by the progressive retention of certain compounds that are normally excreted by the kidneys in healthy individuals, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings might be used to prevent insulin resistance in kidney disease patients, which could lower their risk of developing heart problems. 



Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and insulin resistance - a lowered level of response to insulin circulating in the blood - is an important cardiovascular risk factor in these patients. It's not clear why patients with CKD often develop insulin resistance, but the retention of compounds that are normally removed from the blood and excreted in the urine may play a role. One such compound is p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), a toxin that is produced by gut bacteria. PCS is retained in CKD patients, and it is poorly removed by most dialysis techniques.

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