NDT-EDUCATIONAL

Medication-resistant hypertension present in most people with moderate kidney disease

More than 50% of individuals with moderate kidney disease have hypertension that is resistant to medications, and those who are black or have a larger waist circumference, diabetes, or a history of heart attacks or strokes are at highest risk, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). The findings could help identify kidney disease patients who need more intensive monitoring and treatments for hypertension.

 

Approximately 60 million people globally have chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is common among these patients and is linked with poor health outcomes in the future. Resistant hypertension, which is particularly serious, refers to blood pressure that requires four or more classes of antihypertensive medications to achieve blood pressure control. Rikki Tanner, MPH, Paul Muntner, PhD (University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health) and their colleagues looked for a link between kidney function and resistant hypertension among 10,700 participants who were treated for hypertension in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.

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